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by 楊雅婷 2011-06-10 09:10:23, Reply(0), Views(1149)
  Based on the ideas of Karl Marx, this theoretical approach asks us to consider how a literary work reflects the socioeconomic conditions of the time in which it was written. What does the text tell us about contemporary social classes and how does it reflect classism? Jane Eyre depicts the strict, hierarchical class system in England that required everyone to maintain carefully circumscribed class positions. Primarily through the character of Jane, it also accents the cracks in this system, the places where class differences were melding in Victorian England. For example, the novel questions the role of the governess: Should she be considered upper class, based on her superior education, or lower class, because of her servant-status within the family? What happens when relationships develop between people of different classes, such as Rochester and Jane?  
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by 楊雅婷 2011-06-10 09:07:10, Reply(0), Views(1053)
A Postcolonial Approach to Jane Eyre   As a theoretical approach, postcolonialism asks readers to consider the way colonialist and anti-colonialist messages are presented in literary texts. It argues that Western culture is Eurocentric, meaning it presents European values as natural and universal, while Eastern ideas are, for example, inferior, immoral, or "savage." A postcolonial approach to Jane Eyre might begin by considering the following questions: What does the novel reveal about the way cultural difference was represented in Victorian culture? How did Britain justify its colonialist project by imaging the East as "savage" or uncivilized? What idea does the text create of "proper" British behavior? Tentative answers to these questions can be discovered by examining the novel's representation of foreign women, especially Bertha Mason, and the colonialist doctrines of Jane and of St. John Rivers.
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by 楊雅婷 2011-06-10 09:05:16, Reply(0), Views(1115)
  A Jungian Approach to Jane Eyre   The famous psychologist Carl Jung was interested in the collective unconscious, or the primordial images and ideas that reside in every human being's psyche. Often appearing in the form of dreams, visions, and fantasies, these images provoke strong emotions that are beyond the explanation of reason. In Jane Eyre, the bounds of reality continually expand, so that dreams and visions have as much validity as reason, providing access to the inner recesses of Jane's and Rochester's psyches. Their relationship also has a supernatural component.
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by 楊雅婷 2011-06-09 21:21:50, Reply(0), Views(1233)
  Jane Eyre (the novel, not the character) looks down its nose in disgust at the existing Victorian class hierarchy. The characters who are most interested in the trappings of wealth and status
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by 楊雅婷 2011-06-09 21:12:40, Reply(0), Views(1162)
In Jane Eyre, marriage is about a combination of three things: compatibility, passion, and ethics. A marriage only works between like-minded individuals with similar attitudes and outlooks on life. In
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by 楊雅婷 2011-05-23 23:15:37, Reply(0), Views(1427)
This is a musical drama with music and lyrics by composer-lyricist Paul Gordon and a book by John Caird, based on the novel by Charlotte Brontë. The musical premiered on Broadway in 2000.
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by 楊雅婷 2011-05-23 22:32:03, Reply(0), Views(1458)
It is a 1970 TV-film directed by Delbert Mann starring George C. Scott and Susannah York. It is based on the 1847 novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë.
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by 楊雅婷 2011-05-23 20:32:44, Reply(0), Views(1576)
Jane Eyreis a 1934 American romantic drama film directed by Christy Cabanne, starring Virginia Bruceand Colin Clive. It is based on the 1847novel of the same nameby Charlotte Brontë, and is the first adaptation to use sound.
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by 楊雅婷 2011-05-21 23:50:53, Reply(0), Views(1151)
  Bertha Maso                              Bertha Mason is a complex presence in Jane Eyre. She impedes Jane’s happiness, but she also catalyses the growth of Jane’s self-understanding. The mystery surrounding Bertha establishes suspense and terror to the plot and the atmosphere. Further, Bertha serves as a remnant and reminder of Rochester’s youthful libertinism.
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by 楊雅婷 2011-05-21 23:15:48, Reply(0), Views(1146)
1. What do the names mean in Jane Eyre? Some names to consider include: Jane Eyre, Gateshead, Lowood, Thornfield, Reed, Rivers, Miss Temple, and Ferndean. The name “Jane Eyre” elicits many associations. The contrast between Jane’s first name—with its traditional association with “plainness”—and the names of the novel’s well-born women (Blanche, Eliza, Georgiana, Diana, Rosamond) highlights Jane’s lack of status, but it also emphasizes her lack of pretense. Jane’s last name has many possible interpretations, none of which mutually excludes the other. “Eyre” is an archaic spelling for “air,” and throughout the book, Jane is linked to the spiritual or ethereal as she drifts, windlike, from one location to the next. In French, “aire” refers to a bird’s nesting place, among other things. Jane is compared to a bird repeatedly throughout the novel, and she often uses her imagination as a “nesting-place” of sorts, a private realm where she can feel secure. In medieval times, “eyre” also signified circuit-traveling judges. Perhaps Jane’s name is meant to bring attention to her role as a careful evaluator of all that she sees, and to the importance that she attaches to justice. “Eyre” also sounds like “heir,” and its other homophone—“err”—could certainly be interpreted to be meaningful, especially to feminist and religious critics who take issue with Jane’s actions!
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